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Articles Tagged: Washington Monthly

How are the Hidden Tribes distributed across the American Nations?

At Washington Monthly, Nationhood Lab director Colin Woodard shared the results of new research showing the underlying value sets and moral foundations of Americans are distributed differently across U.S. regional cultures. The online piece described… Read more »

The early 20th century Appalachian migration to Great Lakes cities created big tensions, but did it help bring down the New Deal coalition?

Readers of American Nations know the U.S. is an awkward federation of regional cultures which don’t see eye to eye. So it’s not surprising that when a huge number of… Read more »

How a “freedom-and-fairness” agenda can save the U.S. republic and federation

In the new print edition of Washington Monthly, Nationhood Lab Director Colin Woodard laid out how a “freedom-and-fairness” political agenda can steer the United States out of the dangerous, demagogue-infested… Read more »

Washington Monthly: Woodard on Nationhood Lab’s new insights into the geography of gun violence

For Washington Monthly, Nationhood Lab director Colin Woodard wrote about the findings of a new the project’s recent work on how centuries-old settlement patterns help explain the staggering regional differences… Read more »

U.S. nationhood was created nearly from scratch in the 19th century. Was Daniel Webster responsible?

The early United States, scholars have noted, was a country in search of nationhood. Created as an ad hoc military alliance of disparate colonies to fight off a shared political… Read more »

Reviewing David Hackett Fisher’s Albion’s Seed sequel in Washington Monthly

More than thirty years ago, Brandeis historian David Hackett Fischer resuscitated the effort to develop a historical narrative of the United States with a book called Albion’s Seed, a sweeping… Read more »

Reviewing Yascha Mounk’s “Great Experiment” in Washington Monthly

The world’s ongoing slide into authoritarianism has generated a frantic effort among political scientists, historians, and national security experts to identify the causes and possible solutions. University of Chicago law… Read more »

Reviewing Matthew Pearl’s “Taking of Jemima Boone” in Washington Monthly

“The frontier” has played a huge role in the American imagination, a place where civilization and savagery supposedly met and the former — with allegedly heroic intent and deeds —… Read more »